Support

You can find the User Manual for Network Logger Pro under the application’s “Help” menu in the menu bar at the top of the screen.

For technical support, email:
emailaddress2

Frequently asked questions (FAQ):

Q:  ”What are the system requirements for Network Logger Pro?”
A:  Currently Network Logger Pro requires OSX 10.7 “Lion” as a minimum and has been verified to work with 10.9 “Mavericks.”


Q:  ”We have recently moved to a new internet provider and are finding recurring, but inconsistent internet service periods “randomly” (it seems) – we lose our connection for 1 to 4 minutes and then it magically restores itself. We’ve had the ISP replace the router/modem, check the line on their end, etc.  I’m looking for an Internet Monitoring tool that I can run for a day or two that will continuously check the connection (to the primary DNS server?) and log “outages” so that I can “prove” to the ISP that it’s occurring, and when /how long outages occur. …  Will your tool meet our needs, or do you know of a tool that will fulfill these needs?”
A:  
Yes, logging outages is one of Network Logger Pro’s primary features.

Q: Why do my OSX Network System Preferences show a green “Active” indicator showing a network connection, when Network Logger Pro says the nework is down?
A: 
 The green indicators on the OSX System Preferences->Networks panel, indicate that the system thinks it is connected to your router, but you don’t actually know if the router or modem itself is connected correctly, until Network Logger makes a URL request and gets an answer back.  It’s possible to show network traffic in the realtime display but not have URL tests complete if either A.) you have a DNS issue or if B.) the internet connection is down but you have traffic on your local network.  It is possible, for instance, to have a local DNS problem that prevents web pages from loading, while a Netflix movie that was started before the problem occurred, to keep playing.  To force a URL test, you can hit the “Now” button on the URL Monitor Panel.  It’s also worth trying a web page in your web browser.  For Network Logger to be absolutely sure that the connection is up and working correctly for web traffic, it relies on getting a response to a URL request, because that shows that there is a connection and that DNS is working properly.  Only then will it list the network status as “Online.”  It may be worth restarting your system since OSX has had some local problems with DNS recently


Q:  Why doesn’t my URL work in the URL Monitor?

A:  Make sure your URL begins with http://  first of all.  Some URLs are malformed, meaning they contain spaces or other characters that don’t conform to the URL standard, most browsers will fix malformed URLs by a process called “percent escaping.” If your URL works in a browser, simply copy it from the browser’s URL field and paste it into Network Logger Pro.